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Posts Tagged ‘identity theft’

Teaching Kids About Identity Theft

May 13, 2013 5 comments

Today, E-Crime Expert is pleased to introduce Nancy Parker, who is a freelance writer which loves writing articles on opinions and social awareness. Nancy is a frequent contributor for http://www.enannysource.com.

According to Julie Myhre*:

Identity theft occurs when someone gets a hold of someone else’s personal information and poses as that person or uses that information to create their own fake identity. This information can be a full name, social security number or a bank account number“.

For children, identity theft occurs a little differently. Child identity thieves are looking for their victim’s Social Security number. Since children don’t have any credit history, it makes it easier for thieves to use their Social Security number and a false birthday to open credit cards.

Read bellow this interesting interview conducted by Michelle LaRowe:

“Identity theft is a real problem and, sadly, children are not exempt from having their identities stolen. Recently, I connected with Julie Myhre, who covers identity theft for NextAdvisor.com, and here is what she had to say.

eNannySource: How does identity theft happen?

Julie: Identity theft occurs when someone gets a hold of someone else’s personal information and poses as that person or uses that information to create their own fake identity. This information can be a full name, social security number or a bank account number. It’s usually easier for identity thieves to get information about an adult because adults have a lot of personal information about them; however, it is important to also remember that children can be victims of identity theft too. There are a lot of different ways that adults can be hacked; some of these include not having privacy settings on social media, clicking on phishing emails or pop-ups, losing a wallet, throwing away documents that contain personal information, and ATM or credit card skimming, among others.

For children, identity theft occurs a little differently. Child identity thieves are looking for their victim’s Social Security number. Since children don’t have any credit history, it makes it easier for thieves to use their Social Security number and a false birthday to open credit cards. The unfortunate part about this is that people who were victims of child identity theft don’t usually realize it until they are older and trying to apply for a credit card or loan. Thieves usually gather children’s personal information from sports team applications, school documents and any other documents that would have your child’s Social Security number on it.

eNannySource: How is it prevented?

Julie: There are a lot of different steps that you can take to prevent identity theft. One of the major ways to prevent identity theft is to sign up for an identity theft protection service. Most of these services monitor your personal information regularly and alert you if they notice any suspicious or possibly fraudulent activity. A good amount of these services also offer family plans, which will allow you to protect your whole family – including your children – from identity theft.

Some other options to prevent identity theft include shredding all documents that contain yours or your child’s personal information, checking your bank accounts and credit card statements regularly, monitoring your credit report and, lastly, knowing what you and your child post online. A lot of people don’t realize how much information they post about themselves and their family on social media. It’s fine if you want to include some personal information – such as your full name and photo – but make sure that you set your profile to private. Monitor what you and your child post on social media, and check the privacy settings regularly – at least monthly.

eNannySource: What basic things can parents teach children to avoid identity theft?

Julie: Parents should teach their children about identity theft in a similar manner that they teach them about strangers. If you think about it, it’s essentially very similar – someone you don’t know is trying to take something from you. Parents just need to teach their children that their personal information is private and they should not reveal any of it to people they don’t know. Children won’t understand the details of identity theft, so it’s important not to go into too many details. The bottom line is personal information should be kept personal, and it’s important that parents recognize that and teach it to their children.

eNannySource: What age do parents have to start worrying about identity theft?

Julie: Parents should begin to think about ways to protect their child from identity theft as soon as their child has a Social Security number.

eNannySource: Is it worth investing in some type of protection?

Julie: Yes, in most circumstances identity theft protection is worth the investment. The value of identity theft protection isn’t necessarily in the active personal information monitoring, because the reality is that people can do that part themselves. Instead, the value lies in the identity theft recovery that these services offer. In the instance that yours or your child’s identity is stolen while you’re signed up for an identity theft protection service, you are provided with all the information and tools you need to recover yours or your child’s good name. Identity theft protection services represent you when you’re dealing with the banks, credit bureaus and creditors. It lightens the load on the victim’s side and helps alleviate the nightmare of identity theft. The identity theft recovery assistance is a valuable tool to have if yours or your child’s identity is stolen.

eNannySource: What about the Internet? What are the top tips for parents of kids who use the Internet?

Julie: The most important tip that parents need to follow when their children use the Internet is to monitor what your child is doing and posting on the Internet. Have open communication with your child and make them aware that they shouldn’t be putting any personal information on the Internet – even if it’s your home address in a private message to a friend. Check in with your child and make sure these rules are being followed on all platforms, including the computer, cell phone and tablet. Check your child’s privacy settings on their phone and social media once a month to make sure the information they post on the Internet is set to private”.

*Julie Myhre is the Content Manager at NextAdvisor.com. You can review identity theft protection reviews and learn more about identity theft on the site.

To read the original post and find more about Julie, please click here.

This interesting interview nicely connects to one of E-Crime Expert‘s blog post, called: How secure is your Child’s Social Security Number?

If you have any question you could contact: dan@e-crimeexpert.com

Additional information can be found at: www.e-crimeexppert.com

Hit the “subscribe” button in order to be notified when new videos and Articles are posted on this blog.

What to do in case of credit/payment card fraud: real life example!

This weekend E-Crime Expert encountered a financial fraud which happened to us in real life. Money was fraudulently withdrawn from our (Dan’s) account. Luckily, we immediately identified the fraud which enables us to cancel the card and report the fraud in order to be reimbursed.

1.      How it could be detected:

i. Go log into your online banking account (Fig. 1)

(I am using a mobile platform for my online banking)

Fig. 1.

photo 1

ii. Type your user name or card number and password (Fig. 2)

 Fig. 2

photo 2

iii. Select one of your accounts and then go through your transaction records carefully and see if there is any transaction you do not recognize (this is how I identified the fraud in my VISA account).Fig. 3.

Fig. 3

photo 3

iv. Most likely the fraudulent transaction will be from a service provider or vendor that you had nothing to do with it (as it happened in my case) Fig. 4.

 Fig. 4

photo 4

2. What to do if you suspect fraudulent activity:

 Despite your best efforts, there is still a chance that you will become a victim of payment card fraud. You will save yourself time and worry by following the steps below:

  • Call your financial institution immediately. You can find the phone number easily on the back of your card (Fig. 5).

Fig. 5 photo 5

 It may want to cancel your current card and mail you a new one. Check to verify that your mailing address has not been changed.   

  • If you still have your card, but fraudulent purchases have been made on the account, call your financial institution, and ask them to issue you a new one.   
  • Contact the national credit bureaus to let them know you are a victim of fraud. They will place a “Fraud Alert” on your file. You can also request copies of your credit report, which you should review carefully. For North America:                                   Equifax: 1-800-465-7166 or www.equifax.ca
                                                                                TransUnion: 1-866-525-0262 or www.tuc.ca
  • Diligently check your statements in the following months to make sure the problem has been completely resolved.
  • Report the fraudulent activity to the proper authorities, including the police or to the Internet Crime Complaint Center:

i. Mastercard:

To successfully fulfill your mission of how to contact MasterCard fraud,

  • you can call 800-627-8372.
  • If you’re not in the United States, contact MasterCard fraud by calling 636-722-7111.
  • If it’s an emergency related to possible fraud, MasterCard will accept international collect calls.

ii. Visa:

  • Call the bank or other organisation that issued your card, if you know the telephone number. They will immediately block your card and organise a replacement
  • If you do not have your card issuer’s telephone number, use the menu on the Global Card Assistance Directory page for help. 

To use the Global Card Assitance Service Directory Click here.

From the pull-down menu choose the country you are in now. Call the telephone number that appears in the right-hand box. Calls might be free but may carry local telecom fees if one dials using a mobile phone or calls from within a hotel.

If outside the US please make a reverse-charge call to +1 303 967 1096, if within the US, simply dial +1 800 847 2911.

3.  What you need to be prepare to provide when calling:

  • The name of your card issuer
  • The type of card — for example, Visa Electron, Visa Classic, Visa Gold
  • The country where the card was issued

It will help if you can also tell them:

  • Your 16-digit Visa/MasterCard account number
  • If you have your own card account or a partner card
  • Your name as it is printed on the card
  • The address where your statement is sent
  • Your home telephone number
  • How the card went missing or what transaction you find illegitimate
  • Other personal details that will be used as a security check to confirm your identity
  • The identity of the primary cardholder, if you are the secondary cardholder.

4. Tips to stay safe:

i.                    How to prevent identity theft

Identity theft involves acquiring another person’s identification information (such as a social insurance number or any unique identifier) without a person’s knowledge for the purpose of impersonating him or her to commit fraud. The best defense against identity theft is to prevent thieves from getting the information in the first place.

Here are guidelines to follow:

  • Never leave your purse or wallet unattended – keep your personal data and information guarded at all times.   
  • Sign your credit and debit cards in permanent ink as soon as you receive them.   
  • Call your card issuer if a new or reissued card does not arrive when expected.   
  • Don’t carry your social insurance card, birth certificate, or passport in your wallet or purse unless it’s absolutely necessary. Cancel any inactive payment card accounts.   
  • Never throw away receipts in a public trash container. When disposing of receipts or old statements, be sure to destroy the areas where the account number is visible. In general, you should keep all your receipts in a safe place to refer to if you suspect suspicious activity.
  • Check your statements frequently and carefully. Be sure you are familiar with all account activity on the statement. If you find an unauthorized or questionable transaction, call the appropriate organizations immediately.
  • Do not write your credit or debit card account number on a cheque, or use it for identification when paying by other means.
  • If your social insurance card or driver’s license is missing, contact the appropriate agency immediately.
  • Never give any payment card, bank, or social insurance information to anyone by telephone, even if you made the call, unless you can positively verify that the call is legitimate and there is a true need for the information.
  • Keep a list of all your credit accounts and bank accounts in a secure place so you can quickly call the issuers to inform them about missing or stolen cards. Include account numbers, expiration dates, and telephone numbers of customer service and fraud departments.
  • Make a note of when your financial statements arrive each month. If your statements stop arriving, contact your bank immediately.
  • Obtain a copy of your credit report once a year from one of the national credit bureaus. You are entitled to a free copy of your report if you are denied credit. Otherwise, most credit bureaus will charge a small fee. If the report data is incorrect, write the credit bureau immediately and keep a copy of your letter.

 ii.                  How to prevent fraud while using your payment card

Payment cards are used everyday by billions of people throughout the world. By following the steps below, you will significantly reduce the chances of fraudulent activity occurring on your account:

  • When making a purchase, keep your card in view at all times. Retrieve the card as soon as the transaction is complete and make sure it is yours.
  • Memorize your passwords and personal identification numbers (PINs) so you do not have to write them down. Be aware of your surroundings; make sure no one is watching you input your PIN.
  • Never sign a blank receipt slip. Draw a line through any blank amount lines that appear above the total amount line.
  • Save all of your receipts so you can refer to them at a later time. Never discard your receipt in a public trash container.
  • Do not provide your account number over the phone unless you are positive the call is legitimate and there is a legitimate purpose to disclose your account number. Never provide your number over the phone if you didn’t initiate the call.
  • Avoid saying your account number aloud at a merchant location or over the phone if others can hear.

iii.                How to prevent fraud while shopping online

Shopping online opens up a world of choices and convenience – as well as some risks that require extra vigilance. Here are some tips to ensure that your online shopping experience remains safe and enjoyable:

  • Make sure you are doing business with a reputable Internet merchant. Check with the Better Business Bureau or provincial and local consumer agencies to find out about past complaints or experiences from other customers. You can also look for the following information on the website to check if a merchant is reputable:
    • Privacy policy – A reputable website often has a clearly stated privacy policy in an accessible place. Read the privacy policy so you know exactly how the merchant intends to use your information.
    • Information about the offer – make sure you learn all you can about the offer, including the delivery date, terms of warranty, cancellation policies, how to contact the company if you have questions, etc.
    • Information about the merchant – make sure to find the company’s physical address and telephone number.
    • Security – Reputable websites often provide information about how they protect your financial information when it is transmitted and stored.
  • Guard your personal information. Don’t provide information that you are uncomfortable giving. Never give anyone the password that you use to log on to your Internet Service Provider or online bank account.   
  • Keep records. Print out all information about your online transaction and keep it in a safe place to refer to at a later time.   
  • Pay with a payment card – as this is often the safest way to pay online. In North America, the cardholder has the right to dispute charges if the goods or services were misrepresented or never delivered. Also, you are not responsible for fraudulent purchases made on your account.   
  • Make sure the merchant that you are dealing with has proper security measures in place. Your computer browser can tell you if the place where you are about to send the information is secure. Look for an unbroken key or closed lock at the bottom of the browser window. If you cannot determine this, do not put your credit or debit card information over the Internet.
  • Hover the weblink on the browser you are using to see if there is no hidden link from a fake or illegitimate cloned website.

iv.                 Setting up your best security for your Visa Card:

Visa has developed several layers of fraud prevention and detection systems and programs, giving you multiple checkpoints for security to protect your business and make transactions more secure. Visa’s Layers of Security complement each other and work together, so by implementing multiple services you can help reduce your risk of fraud.

The Layers of Security:

Layer # 1 – Chip & PIN

Many Visa cards now contain a micro-computer chip that securely stores encrypted information to complete transactions. As well, Personal Identification Numbers (PINs) are used for cardholder authentication when chip cards are used in Canada. This helps make counterfeiting virtually impossible.

Layer # 2 – Verified by Visa

The Verified by Visa (VbV) program is a worldwide service that confirms a cardholder’s authenticity in real time. This helps protect merchants from fraudulent transactions and chargebacks, while protecting cardholders from unauthorized use of their Visa cards.

Layer # 3 – Three-digit Code (CVV2)

The CVV2 is a three-digit security code on all Visa cards that helps ensure a customer making an online or phone purchase has a genuine Visa card in hand.

Layer # 4 – Address Verification Service (AVS)

When fraudsters try to order online, by mail or by phone, AVS can help stop them in their tracks. Account number information obtained from a receipt or a stolen card does not include an address or postal code. AVS checks a cardholder’s address and/or postal code against the card issuer’s records in real time, giving you the opportunity to stop a transaction if desired.

Layer # 5 – Visa Advanced Authorization (VAA)

Available through most card issuers, VAA lets you immediately identify and respond to emerging fraud patterns and trends. As transactions are processed through VisaNet® Advanced Authorization, VAA evaluates an authorization request data in real time and assesses and assigns a risk rating – helping you better identify potential fraud.

5.      Additional contact numbers for Canada only:

MasterCard Issuer Security Phone Numbers in Canada:

ATB Financial: 1-800-661-2266
BMO Bank of Montreal: 1-800-361-3361
Bridgewater Bank: 1-866-398-4404
Canadian Tire Bank: 1-800-459-6415
Capital One Canada: 1-800-481-3239
CIBC:   1-800-663-4575
Citibank Canada: 1-800-305-7259
Credit Union Electronic Transaction Services: 1-800-567-8111
Direct Cash Bank: 1-888-466-4043
GE Money Canada: 1-800-243-2222
HSBC Bank Canada: 1-866-406-4722
MBNA Canada: 1-800-379-2744
National Bank of Canada: 1-888-622-2783
Peoples Trust: 1-866-452-1138
President’s Choice Bank: 1-866-246-7262
RBC Royal Bank: 1-800-361-0152
Sears Canada: 1-800-288-9965
Walmart Financial Services Canada: 1-888-925-6218
Wells Fargo Financial: 1-888-295-0050
     

 If you have any question you could contact: dan@e-crimeexpert.com

Additional information can be found at: www.e-crimeexppert.com

Hit the “subscribe” button in order to be notified when new videos and Articles are posted on this blog.

18 Blogs with Techniques for Preventing Identity Theft

April 30, 2013 3 comments

Our concern for privacy and information security aims to cover most of our daily life areas from IT, Social Networking Services, Online Commerce, to children or why not nannies.

For this reason, E-Crime Expert is glad to have NannyWebsites.com as a guest today.  NannyWebsites.com is the most comprehensive guide for nannies seeking advice, support and information. It helps gaining resource for nannies, nanny employers and those interested in in-home childcare on the web. You can check out their website here.

The blog post bellow is provided by NannyWebsites.com.

“Identity theft has become an increasing problem as our world shifts to being more online and mobile.  Many people feel like there is no way to keep their information safe should someone want to steal it.  Is this the case, or are there things that you can do to make your information harder to steal?  These 18 blog entries touch on what you can do to protect your identity online, at work and when you are out and about living your life.  The press is doing an admirable job of bringing scams to light so that the public can be better informed and thus better able to protect sensitive information.  To learn what you need to know to keep your personal information safe, keep reading.

Online

With more and more people shopping and banking online, keeping your information safe from thieves becomes both more important and more difficult.  Avoid common or easy to guess passwords, as many times you are making the thief’s job easier.  For more online safety tips, take a look at these six blog posts.

At Work

While your employer likely has their own security measures in place, you still need to make sure that you are keeping your personal information safe from hackers or other co-workers.  When you go to a meeting make sure that your desk and computer are locked.  Don’t get your personal e-mail on your work computer, as that information can stay in that computer, even if you delete it.  To learn more important safeguards, read these six blog articles.

Out and About

If you pay for your gas and other snacks with a credit card that you can tap and go, you may want to stop using it.  While it’s a convenient way to pay for things, it’s also an easy way for a thief to pick up the credit card number at the same time.  When you are out for dinner and you pay the bill by sending your credit card with the waiter, you may want to keep an eye on him.  Specialized equipment designed to steal credit card numbers in a hurry have been found in various restaurants.  Check out these six blog articles and learn more about identity theft scams going on today and how to avoid becoming a victim.

To read the original Article click here.

If you have any question you could contact: dan@e-crimeexpert.com

Additional information can be found at: www.e-crimeexppert.com

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Cybercrimes: Battling a New Kind of Home Intruder

December 18, 2012 1 comment

As technology it is not slowing down and cybercrime is on the rise — it is crucial that information on cybercrime and awareness is made more available for all people. For this reasons, E-Crime Expert is glad to welcome Home Security, as a guest and feature their valuable website and material bellow.

About:

Home Security.org is a constantly developing comprehensive Home Security and Personal Security information resource.

The blog post below is provided by Home Security.

In the not-too-distant past, the threat of hacking was confined to PCs and laptops. Today, we rely on a proliferation of electronic devices for communication, directions and entertainment – all potential channels of information for hackers with malicious intent. Wi-Fi and Bluetooth technology, cell phones, Global Positioning Services (GPS), Internet-enabled TVs, tablets and wired cars are all susceptible to thieves trying to access critical personal information.

Cybercrime is on the rise, one of the most rapidly growing areas of prosecuted crime. Hackers may be computer geeks with malicious intent, identity thieves, spies, traders in illegal pornography or businesses attempting to disrupt competitor’s websites. The impact on society can be staggering, ranging from downed systems for vital infrastructure like hospitals or emergency response systems to financial cost. Brand damage is difficult to measure, and the cost to repair and prevent future damage from hackers annually runs into the billions.

What Kinds of Cybercrime Exist?

While it seems that hackers crack codes for every new device that hits the marketplace, there are some defined forms of cybercrime that have been deemed illegal by state and federal authorities.

  • Harassment: The most common form of cybercrime, the term harassment includes obscenities or insulting comments directed towards an individual or group of individuals, and may or may not be related to sexual orientation, religion, ethnicity or gender.
  • Offensive Content: Obscene and distasteful content on the Internet is not only something that children should not see; it is illegal in many countries.
  • Fraud: Internet fraud can take many forms, but it is most often in the guise of misrepresenting oneself and enticing a consumer to provide sensitive information. Fraud is usually financial in nature and is often related to identity theft. Technically, it is also fraudulent to use your neighbor’s Internet signal if you are not paying for it.
  • Trespassing: Hackers illegally gain access to individual hard drives and can remove or copy files, install software, view browsing history and access your passwords. Trespassing is often fraudulent; for example, a cloned website of a familiar vendor may request that readers click a link or download a file that allows access to a hard drive.
  • Drug Trafficking: Encrypted emails are used by drug traffickers around the world to share manufacturing formulas and arrange deals and delivery of illegal drugs.
  • Hardware Hijacking: Some peripheral externals, like printers, contain design flaws that allow them to automatically receive software updates via an Internet connection. Criminals can surreptitiously download damaging files to these devices.
  • Spam: Unsolicited e-mail is not only annoying; it is often used for phishing, a practice that deceives users into providing delicate data such as Social Security numbers, birthdates, passport identification numbers or credit card numbers. This information is used by identity thieves, or to access bank and credit card accounts. Spam often contains malicious bits of code that can permanently damage your computer. Some spammers practice spoofing, allowing them to use your email address to send the same code to everyone in your address book.
  • Information Warfare: Targeted at businesses and large, complex systems, information warfare aims to disable these systems. These cybercriminals either use malicious code or repeatedly hit the server from multiple computers at once, causing the target server to crash.
  • Malware: A very common source of disabled devices is malware, or malicious software. Malware files can be downloaded to your device without your consent, sometimes even without your knowledge. These files allow criminals to monitor your activities on your device or crash it permanently. Cell phones are particularly prone to malware due to their small screen size; it may be easy to miss a link or download notification on a cell phone.

Devices other than laptops and cellphones are at risk. In April 2012, Sony’s PlayStation Network was famously hacked, shutting down its network and releasing personal information for 100 million users. Internet TVs, designed to allow access to streaming content like Netflix and Pandora, open a window for hackers to not only access your television, but any computers that are linked to the same network. Cars that are wired for personal use, which are increasingly popular in new models, may provide criminals a pathway to your phone and all of the delicate information kept therein. Alarmingly, it was recently proven that medical devices such as insulin pumps for diabetics can be hacked and controlled by an outsider.

Smartphone apps, those useful and helpful tools we love, can offer opportunities for hacking. Home alarm systems that are controlled by apps may allow an evil-minded hacker to access your home’s security features without your knowledge. Many popular apps are based on GPS systems, which are often provided to third parties without your knowledge. The ubiquitous Bluetooth technology is not immune to exposure; hackers can spam your phone, access its contents or take it over completely via Bluetooth channels.

Are We Defenseless?

While consumers should be aware of the possibilities, there is no reason to panic. Developers are creating code that resists hacking attempts as fast as hackers come up with new tactics, and the U.S. government is watchful. The Department of Justice, the FBI and the Department of Homeland Security all have personnel dedicated to the eradication of cybercrime, and hackers are prosecuted with misdemeanor or felony charges.

There is much you can do to protect yourself from cybercrime. Your devices are programmable for varying levels of protection, and manufacturers of the products you use pre-install protection measures and offer upgrades to security when necessary. Take advantage of these tools and make the following security best practices part of your routine:

  1. Turn off your computer. It is common practice to leave computers on all the time, especially given our impatience with rebooting. Unfortunately, leaving a computer in “sleep mode” offers no more protection than your antivirus software provides, and today’s high-speed networks can allow a hacker to access your PC or laptop swiftly. A computer that is turned off cannot be hacked from an external source.
  2. Update your antivirus software. Companies who manufacture this software are constantly revising code to keep up with new threats, and many issue patches within hours of the appearance of a new worm or malware. Even Macs, once considered immune to viruses, have been infected. Consider bolstering your current software with additional protection. Set your software to receive updates automatically, and ensure that you have spyware protection.
  3. Update your operating system. Similar to antivirus software developers, the manufacturers of your operating system are constantly reacting to new cybercrime threats. Unfortunately, some viruses, worms and malware take the guise of a software update and trick users into downloads. Take the extra few minutes to learn exactly how your system will notify you of an official update, and follow directions when prompted. If you are unsure whether an update is legitimate, check your system user’s guide.
  4. Download wisely. Never open an attachment from someone you do not know, and be suspicious of email forwards with unexplained or confusing attachments. Many antivirus programs, such as Vipre, offer an email protection setting that can alert you to a suspicious attachment from a known user; both traditional corporate and free email clients like Gmail can benefit from this extra protection. When surfing the web, set your page security settings high so that you don’t inadvertently download malware; a strong antivirus program will warn you or prevent you from accessing sites that are dangerous.
  5. Always turn on your firewall. Most laptops and PCs are equipped with a firewall, a barrier to malicious elements that can be configured to a single computer or to a network. Firewalls are commonly pre-configured into the hardware of your computer and protect you from all incoming information. Check the system security on your laptop or PC to see that you have a firewall and that it is turned on. You may also download additional firewall protection. A router for a home wireless network connection provides an extra layer of protection; routers that are set to provide wireless connectivity to multiple devices in your home automatically discard any malicious incoming traffic that is not directed to a single IP address.
  6. Be aware when traveling internationally. Any devices that you travel with, including cell phones, are vulnerable. Exercise caution where free wi-fi is offered, such as in coffee shops and airports. When you access a wireless signal outside of your home’s firewall protection, you are more vulnerable. Take only the devices you need, and back them up before you travel. Consider deleting sensitive data for the duration of your trip and using completely different access passwords for your devices. The FCC offers additional tips for travelers with electronic devices.

Vigilance and awareness are the two best defenses you can provide. The world of cybercrime is fast-moving, and talented individuals with evil intent are attempting to break into new devices as fast as they are developed. However, staying aware of current events in cybercrime news and the updates you may need, as well as fully exploiting the crime prevention tools at your disposal, will keep your home and your data safe from intruders”.

More resources provided my Home Security could be found here.

Also, please check out their other sections on the same topic:

Any questions can be submitted to: dan@e-crimeexpert.com

Additional information can be found at: www.e-crimeexppert.com

Hit the “subscribe” button in order to be notified when new videos and Articles are posted on this blog.

How Secure Is Your Child’s Social Security Number?

October 24, 2012 17 comments

E-Crime Expert brings you today an interesting Information Security web show on how Children are the most vulnerable for identity and financial information theft.

Concise Courses organized a web show titled: “How Secure Is Your Child’s Social Security Number?” with three expert speakers on the subject: Michelle Dennedy, Bo Holland and Andrew Serwin. Michelle serves as Chief Privacy Officer at McAfee and founded the iDennedy Project. Bo founded AllClear ID, and Andrew has handled child security matters before the Federal Trade Commission in information security and COPPA.

You can watch the recorded Information Security web show video including a short presentation of the special guests here.

Michelle mentioned that historically child identity theft was never considered to be a problem, however, statistics today show that 11% of kids have their Social Security Number stolen and used to obtain illegal credit. Think about that! In a classroom of 11, one child will have their identity being used to secure mortgages, purchase cars etc. When asked about victim impact for the child and parents, Michelle mentioned that of course it can be very traumatic – not least because, for example, access to education funds can be withheld and the cost to “clean” the credit can be very expensive.

One of the many excellent points that Bo mentioned was that victims keep getting younger because the likelihood of parents checking their child’s credit is minimal, especially if their children are under the age of ten.

Andrew spoke on various equally interesting topics and identified social media as particularly problematic since children can very easily volunteer personal information such as birth date, address and other details that can be used for fraudulent activity.

If you have question please contact us at: dan@e-crimeexpert.com

LinkedIn new Scam: Upgrade free to LinkedIn Premium

August 8, 2012 15 comments

Today, E-Crime Expert encountered a new scam, related to LinkedIn this time.

How it woks:

I received an email on my regular email address which said that because I am a valuable LinkedIn user, they will upgrade my Basic accoun to a Premium one for free, for one month period.

Picture 1

I did not know that this is a scam so I proceeded with the upgrade. After I clicked “upgrade” I was promted to introduce my LinkedIn password. I did so, but nothing hapenned.

Then, I checked my LinkedIn account on a different webpage and still there my account appears “Basic”, so no upgrade done as promised.

Picture 2

Instantly I realize that this is a scam having as purpose the access of your valuable friends database with email addresses, phone numbers, professions, etc. The purpose of this scam is to retrive for free this valuable information that later can be used for identity theft, or spam, or aother related scams.

Action:

if you did upgrade your account, please change your password as soon as possible

If you received this message but did not upgrade yet, please don’t do it.

If you have further questions, please fel free to contact us at: dan@e-crimeexpert.com

Did you get a New electronic device for Christmas?

January 6, 2012 Leave a comment

Happy New Year to everyone! Wish you all the best for this year, but most importantly, I wish you to be healthy and around your families! Also, stay safe!

Maybe for some of you Santa was kind enough and brought you new electronic devices such as a new laptop, desktop, iPad, tablet or smartphone. That sounds exciting, but have you thought what are you going to do with your old electronic device? Giving it away to charity? Selling it on a classified website, or giving it to a family member or friend? In any of these cases you should first be sure that you are not involuntarily sharring your private info and data. For this reason, E-Crime Expert presents again today some tips on how to remove this personal data from your old electronic device before being given away.

Please watch this video tutorial here:

More details are provided bellow:

A large volume of electronic data is stored on computer systems and electronic media. Much of this data consists of confidential and sensitive information, including patient records, financial data, personnel records, and research information.

If you are with a company or organization that accepts donations or properly dismantles computers, electronics, or hard drives, take them there.

If you have a computer or computer equipment that you believe is beyond repair or is too old to be useful take it to a dismantling centre.

Many computer manufacturers and computer hardware manufactures also have their own recycling or trade in programs. When you buy a new computer you could perhaps trade in the old one.

All computer systems, electronic devices and electronic media should be properly cleared of sensitive data and software before being transferred from you to another seller or dismantling centre.

Computer hard drives should be cleared by using software and then be physically destroyed. Non-rewritable media, such as CDs or non-usable hard drives, should be physically destroyed (ie. scratched, broken into pieces).

Try to destroy or dismantle you hard drive, external hard drive, printer, fax, cell phone, computer, camera, web camera, GPS, laptop because all these devices have internal memory where sensitive data is still stocked even if properly deleted manually or with a software.

When you sell an old laptop or PC, try first to “format” your device and reinstall the operating system- If you are not able to do this, at least try to DELETE:

  • All your photos, videos, music files, located on the following folders: Desktop or My Documents, My Music, My videos (Movies),
  • Archives
  • The folder that retrieves your Mail inbox on your computer
  • Recent documents folder
  • Downloads
  • Library folder
  • Data storage folder
  • Maildownloads folder
  • Info.plist document
  • Key chain, the folder that stores your passwords on a computer
  • Cookies folder
  • Calendar folder
  • Printer folder
  • Cache folder
  • Favorites folder
  • Logs folder
  • Web browser (Safari) folder
  • Sync Services folder used for cloud computing or to sync with other devices
  • Address book

Note: these folders are available on a MacBook Pro device (with Snow Leopard  OS), the order or name of the folders  may differ from computer to computer or from one operating system to another. But the principle is the same.

When you sell your used cellular phone try to do a “factory data reset” and all the information and personal settings will be removed. This is mandatory when you sell your used device.

Step 1: go to settings

Step 2: select SD&phone storage

Step 3: select Factory data reset

This should reset all your information on your phone.

Note: these folders are available on HTC Desire running on Android version 2.2. 

Any questions can be submitted to: dan@e-crimeexpert.com

Additional information can be found at: www.e-crimeexppert.com

Have you ever used any of those methods? Are you thinking to use any of them? How do you dispose of your electronic devices and gadgets you no longer use?

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