Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Google’

6 Essential Tips on How to Prevent Online Shopping Fraud

February 13, 2014 Leave a comment

Dear readers and followers, I would first like to wish you a very Happy New Year, good health and great personal and professional accomplishments.
As some of you have already purchased products/services online (and I would like to invite you to share your experience with us) and some others will have at a some point, I am featuring today Israel Defeo as guest blogger on this common topic: Online shopping.

Shopping online is easy. You get what you want in a matter of seconds. Just input your credit card information and voila, that book or jacket or bag is already on its way to you within 24 hours.

This is why more shoppers are switching to e-stores and e-transactions—e-payments, e-banking—are fast becoming the norm. Convenience is the ultimate game-changer. Plenty of online shops, too, offer discounts and freebies like free delivery or free shipping.
However, the rise in e-transactions has also made online fraud possible. To prevent online shopping fraud from happening to you, here are some easy tips you can follow:

SecureCode_product%20offering

1. Keep your credit details a secret.

Like the famous quote said, “There are things better left unsaid.” That may be true especially if it’s about your credit, debit or other essential information that need to be kept secret.

mobile_shop_2

2. Use caution when using your devices for online shopping.

Because it’s more convenient to shop online using smartphones, tablets, and other mobile devices with internet access, more consumers prefer to use these gadgets than computers and laptops—which are more secure. Beware of using your handheld devices for transactions that carry your personal and credit card information. In case your device is misplaced or lost, you’re at risk of falling victim to fraudsters and scammers who can extract your private information through the lost device.

Facebook-phishing-page

3. Beware of phishing websites.

Have you ever seen items on some websites offered at very low prices? Though it can be tempting to purchase low-priced bargain items, it can also come at great risk to the safety of your credit and personal details.
There are internet criminals who create phishing or fraudulent websites which trick you into signing up and disclosing your private information. Some of these websites duplicate the content and design of legitimate ones to fool shoppers like you into revealing their credit card details. At this point, it may be better for you to let common sense—or your gut feel—rule. If you feel like the price is unbelievable or a deal sounds too good to be true, chances are, it is. Stay away from fishy-looking sites as much as possible to keep from being a victim of identity theft.

Capture

4. Verify if the website is legitimate or not.

Remember, Google is your friend. This search engine can help you find any information you need to get your hands on. Search for the name of the website and see if there’s anything involving “scam” or “fraud” mentioned in blogs, forums or other online sources.

IC86034

5. Don’t click hyperlinks from random emails.

You probably received not just one, not just two, but more emails about offers and discounts about a product or service in your email. Be mindful of clicking links attached to those messages because it may redirect you to fraudulent websites or phishing sites. Also beware of attachments you receive from untrusted sources. These may contain viruses and malwares that may not just harm your electronic devices, but can also swipe information from your units.
Sometimes, web mail servers can filter unreliable messages and put these messages in the Spam folder of your email. So make sure this feature is enabled in your settings.

untitled

6. Beware of bogus sellers lurking in social media sites

Social media sites are also used by small-scale entrepreneurs to market their products and promote their services to a wider audience. It has been an advantage to both sellers and buyers because Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and other social media platforms can be used for easy communication, placing orders, and completing transactions because it allows real-time responses.
However, scammers can easily post photos and create bogus accounts about bogus products or services. So be mindful of the sellers you buy from. If they cannot ship or send the product they promised after a transaction, you may have already been scammed. To avoid this fate, make sure to call up the seller before you even buy anything. If you smell or hear something fishy or that makes your antennae quiver in suspicion, go and search for another seller until you find one you can trust.

So be careful whenever you use your credit card. Follow the tips mentioned above to help you make sure your credit card and credit information are both safe—and to keep online fraud from happening to you.

This guest post is written by Israel Defeo. He is the writer and online promoter of the leading financial comparison website in Hong Kong, Money Hero. The online portal presents up-to-date and unbiased information about insurance companies, credit cards, loans, deposit accounts and broadband and mobile plans.

Any questions can be submitted to: dan@e-crimeexpert.com
Additional information can be found at: http://www.e-crimeexppert.com
To find out more about Dan Manolescu, visit his LinkedIn page here.
Hit the “subscribe” button in order to be notified when new videos and Articles are posted on this blog

Do you know what is your child’s age requirement to sign up online?

May 27, 2013 1 comment

As the Internet permeates every aspect of the economy and society, it is also becoming an essential element of our children’s lives. While it can bring considerable benefits for their education and development, it also exposes them to online risks such as access to inappropriate content, harmful interactions with other children or with adults, and exposure to aggressive marketing practices.

Children online can also put their computer systems at risk and disseminate their personal data without understanding the potential long-term privacy consequences.

In addition, there are other risks for children using online environments, such as:

Privacy risks

-cyber-bullying

-cyber-stalking

-age-inappropriate content

-online grooming

-identity theft

-emotional implications.

Beside support and guidance from parents when using the online environment, an appropriate mental development and understanding is important for a child when using an online platform. For these reasons, in both the United States and the European Union, a minimum age requirements for accessing the “online world” was set as a legal requirement.

E-Crime Expert thinks that the minimum age requirements a child should meet when signing up for an email account, Facebook, etc., should be a topic of interest for parents. For these reasons, we researched the minimum age requirements on some of the most popular online sites and platforms.

The Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) in United States applies to the online collection of personal information by persons or entities under U.S. jurisdiction from children under 13 years of age. It details what a website operator must include in a privacy policy, when and how to seek verifiable consent from a parent or guardian, and what responsibilities an operator has to protect children’s privacy and safety online including restrictions on the marketing to those under 13. While children under 13 can legally give out personal information with their parents’ permission, many websites altogether disallow underage children from using their services due to the amount of work involved.

In the European Union, the European Commission released in January 2012, a Proposal on the protection of individuals with regard to the processing of personal data and on the free movement of such data (General Data Protection Regulation).

This Proposal has specific requirements with regards to Children. They deserve specific protection of their personal data, as they may be less aware of risks, consequences, safeguards and their rights in relation to the processing of personal data. To determine when an individual is a child, this Regulation should take over the definition laid down by the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child.

“Article 8
Processing of personal data of a child

For the purposes of this Regulation, in relation to the offering of information society services directly to a child, the processing of personal data of a child below the age of 13 years shall only be lawful if and to the extent that consent is given or authorised by the child’s parent or custodian. The controller (i.e. the person in charge with the collection, use and disclosure of personal data) shall make reasonable efforts to obtain verifiable consent, taking into consideration available technology”.

Following, are the minimum age requirements for children using different Internet websites or Social Networking Services and other online platforms:

facebook-age-restriction

 1.      Facebook:

How old do you have to be to sign up for Facebook?

In order to be eligible to sign up for Facebook, you must be at least 13 years old.

The minimum age requirement on Facebook is more or less enforceable. Simply lying about your birthdate easily circumvents the policy.

The Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) mandates that websites that collect information about users aren’t allowed to sign on anyone under the age of 13. As a result, Facebook’s Statement of Rights and Responsibilities require users of the social network to be at least 13 years old (and even older, in some jurisdictions).

According to MinorMonitor, over 38 percent of children with Facebook accounts are 12-years-old and under. Even more worryingly, 4 percent of children on Facebook are reported to be 6-years-old or younger, which translates to some 800,000 kindergarteners on Facebook.

These results come from a survey of 1,000 parents of children under 18-years-old who use Facebook. The company provides a free, web-based parental tool that gives parents a quick view into their child’s Facebook use, including potential dangerous activities such as the friending of online predators, cyberbullying, violence, drug and alcohol use, as well as sexual references.

2.      Google:

Age requirements on Google Accounts:

  •  United States: 13 or older
  •  Spain: 14 or older
  •  South Korea: 14 or older
  •  Netherlands: 16 or older
  •  All other countries: 13 or older

Some Google products have specific age requirements. Here are a few examples:

  • YouTube: When a YouTube video has been age-restricted, a warning screen is displayed and only users who are 18 or older can watch it. Learn more about age-restricted videos.
  • Google Wallet: 18+
  •  AdSense: 18+
  •  AdWords: 18+

3.      Yahoo

When a child under age 13 attempts to register with Yahoo!, they ask the child to have a parent or guardian create a Yahoo! Family Account to obtain parental permission.

Yahoo! does not contact children under age 13 about special offers or for marketing purposes without a parent’s permission.

Yahoo! does not ask a child under age 13 for more personal information, as a condition of participation, than is reasonably necessary to participate in a given activity or promotion.

Yahoo! is concerned about the safety and privacy of all its users, particularly children. For this reason, parents of children under the age of 13 who wish to allow their children access to the Yahoo! Services must create a Yahoo! Family Account. When you create a Yahoo! Family Account and add your child to the account, you certify that you are at least 18 years old and that you are the legal guardian of the child/children listed on the Yahoo! Family Account. By adding a child to your Yahoo! Family Account, you also give your child permission to access many areas of the Yahoo! Services, including, email, message boards and instant messaging (among others). Please remember that the Yahoo! Services is designed to appeal to a broad audience. Accordingly, as the legal guardian, it is your responsibility to determine whether any of the Yahoo! Services areas and/or Content are appropriate for your child.

4.      Hotmail

As on Hotmail’s Terms of Use is no reference to the age requirements to join the service, we did our own registration and it appears that 13 is the age requirement for joining Hotmail, as shown below:

I.                   Attempt indicating the user is 6 years old

Step 1   

1

Step 2                        

2

Step 3

3

 

II.                Second attempt, indicating the user is 13 years old.

Step 1

4Step 2

5

 

5.        MySpace 

  • You must be at least 13 years old to have a Myspace profile
  • If you’re under 16 years old, you’re not allowed to list your age as over 16 and make your profile public (your profile must be set to private)
  • If you’re under 18, you’re not allowed to list your age as over 18
  • Users under 18 are not able to make changes to their listed age

Notes & Tips

  • If you break any of the above rules, MySpace will be forced to delete your profile for safety and security reasons (it’s all in their Terms of Use)

6.      Skype

Skype not directly sets up an age restriction within their Terms of Use.

“Jurisdiction’s Restrictions: If the law of Your country prohibits You from downloading or using Skype Software because You are under the age limit or because the Skype Software is not allowed in Your country, please don’t use it”.

According to this, for US the minimum age requirement is 13 + (COPPA).

7.      LinkedIn

PRIVACY POLICY, 18!

In terms of LinkedIn’s Privacy Policy:

 ”Children are not eligible to use our service and we ask that minors (under the age of 18) do not submit any personal information to us or use the service.”

8.      Twitter

Age screening on Twitter

Age screening is a way for brands and others to determine online whether a follower meets a minimum age requirement, in a way that is consistent with relevant industry or legal guidelines. This makes it easier for advertisers and others with content not suitable for minors (e.g. alcohol advertisers) to advertise on Twitter.

There apparently, is now age restriction for setting up an account on Twitter (as we set it up without being asked about our age). See below:

Step 1

6

Step 2: Done!

7

For more advice on how children could stay safe online (you could also share this with your child), click here to visit the material E-Crime Expert specially created for this purpose.

Any questions can be submitted to: dan@e-crimeexpert.com

Additional information can be found at: www.e-crimeexppert.com

Hit the “subscribe” button in order to be notified when new videos and Articles are posted on this blog.

18 Blogs with Techniques for Preventing Identity Theft

April 30, 2013 3 comments

Our concern for privacy and information security aims to cover most of our daily life areas from IT, Social Networking Services, Online Commerce, to children or why not nannies.

For this reason, E-Crime Expert is glad to have NannyWebsites.com as a guest today.  NannyWebsites.com is the most comprehensive guide for nannies seeking advice, support and information. It helps gaining resource for nannies, nanny employers and those interested in in-home childcare on the web. You can check out their website here.

The blog post bellow is provided by NannyWebsites.com.

“Identity theft has become an increasing problem as our world shifts to being more online and mobile.  Many people feel like there is no way to keep their information safe should someone want to steal it.  Is this the case, or are there things that you can do to make your information harder to steal?  These 18 blog entries touch on what you can do to protect your identity online, at work and when you are out and about living your life.  The press is doing an admirable job of bringing scams to light so that the public can be better informed and thus better able to protect sensitive information.  To learn what you need to know to keep your personal information safe, keep reading.

Online

With more and more people shopping and banking online, keeping your information safe from thieves becomes both more important and more difficult.  Avoid common or easy to guess passwords, as many times you are making the thief’s job easier.  For more online safety tips, take a look at these six blog posts.

At Work

While your employer likely has their own security measures in place, you still need to make sure that you are keeping your personal information safe from hackers or other co-workers.  When you go to a meeting make sure that your desk and computer are locked.  Don’t get your personal e-mail on your work computer, as that information can stay in that computer, even if you delete it.  To learn more important safeguards, read these six blog articles.

Out and About

If you pay for your gas and other snacks with a credit card that you can tap and go, you may want to stop using it.  While it’s a convenient way to pay for things, it’s also an easy way for a thief to pick up the credit card number at the same time.  When you are out for dinner and you pay the bill by sending your credit card with the waiter, you may want to keep an eye on him.  Specialized equipment designed to steal credit card numbers in a hurry have been found in various restaurants.  Check out these six blog articles and learn more about identity theft scams going on today and how to avoid becoming a victim.

To read the original Article click here.

If you have any question you could contact: dan@e-crimeexpert.com

Additional information can be found at: www.e-crimeexppert.com

Hit the “subscribe” button in order to be notified when new videos and Articles are posted on this blog.

%d bloggers like this: