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Posts Tagged ‘Facebook’

Infographic-Privacy and Security on Facebook

November 20, 2013 1 comment

Today, E-Crime Expert has Naomi Paton as guest blogger. She is a passionate writer and loves to write articles related to internet, teen & amp; crime. She writes for Best Computer Science Schools.

The majority of today’s populace uses the internet and social media on a regular basis, but at what cost? Although there has been some research conducted representing the negative effects of internet addiction, less is known about how young adults are being affected by misuse of facebook like bulling, reputation damage, burglary etc.

Bellow is the infographic, created by Naomi Paton, which listed the researched data and the do and don’t facts on Facebook.

Facebook Privacy
Source: BestComputerScienceSchools.net

To view the original Post click here.

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Important security settings on Facebook

October 29, 2013 Leave a comment

Information security is important. Remember that: Without security there is no privacy!Today, E-Crime Expert presents several security measures Facebook has in place for securing your private data and account.

1. Change your password (Frequently)

i. Log on your Facebook Account, go to (click) “Settings” (1)and then click on “Account settings” (2) from the fold down menu(Fig.1).

Fig. 1

1

ii. Go to and select the “General Settings” menu on the left and then click on the “Edit” tab from the Password field (on the right side of the page). See Fig.2.

Fig. 2

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iii. Now, you have to follow the three steps bellow:
-type your current password (for security reasons);
-type your new password (check this blog post here on how to have a strong password);
-type your new password again.
Click “Change password” and your password will be changed. (Fig.3).

Fig.3.

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iv. In order to be sure your password is effectively changed on all your devices, select the “Log me out of other devices” box, click on the “Submit” button from the displayed message that appears after you changed your password. That will enable you to sign out from all the devices you are automaticaley logged on. In this way, once you use them again, you will be prompted to type your new password. This is an extra security measure which enables you to protect your information if one of your devices got lost or stollen or when it is shared with other people (Fig. 4).

Fig. 4.

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2. Check your active sessions

i. You can also check from where you logged on your account lately.
Click on the “Security settings” tab (see pictures above for how to get there) on the left and then go to the right-bottom of the page and select “Edit” from the “Active sessions” menu (Fig.5)

Fig.5

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ii. Now, you can check from where you are logged on during the current session (top of the page) and also, you can check bellow from where you were logged on in your previous sessions.
*Note: if you notice that you appeared logged on from countries you never been or you have not been lately or from devices you do not use that means someone else logged on your account without authorization (Fig.6).
**If you notice any unfamiliar devices or locations, click ‘End Activity’ to end the session and automatically log out someone who’s using your account fraudulently.
Change your password immediately as explained under section 1 of this Blog post!

Fig.6

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3. Secure browsing.

i. Go to “Security settings“, as explained above, find the “Login Notifications” menu and click “Edit“. (Fig.7)

Fig.7

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ii. Then you can select either “Email” or “Text message“. Or you can always select both! Click “Save changes“.
This will enable you to be notified via email or text message when your Facebook account is accessed from a device that you do not recognize (Fig.8).

Fig.8

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iii. Furthermore, you could set up a Log in approval used when login into your account from unknown devices.
Go to “Security settings” (see above) and from there to “Login approvals” (bellow to “Login Notifications”). Click “Edit” and then select the box that reads: “Require a security code to access my account from unknown browsers“. Don’t forget to click “Save changes“. Now you are set for receiving notifications or be prompted a code (that will be delivered via your email or text message as a one-time token) before logging into your Facebook account, from unknown devices (Fig.9).
In order to learn what an unknown or unrecognized device means, keep reading this post bellow.

Fig.9

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4. Recognized devices.

You can always set up the devices of your choice when using Facebook.
Go to “Security Settings” (as explained above), click “Edit” on the “Recognized Devices” menu and see which your recognized devices are. Devices will be assigned to your account as recognized when you will first time log on your Facebook account (using a new password) from a certain device (You will be prompted with a message whether you would like to save a certain devices as a recognized device or not). Be careful; do not select as a “Recognized Devices” a computer from school, work, public library or hotel. For this reason and in order to check which are your recognized devices check that menu and see if the devices listed there are the one you trust. If not, you just simply click “Remove” on the right side of a particular device (for example when there is listed a device you used once in a library).
Don’t forget to click “Save changes” as usually (Fig.10).

Fig.10

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5. Trusted friends

i. To get set up, visit your “Security Settings” (as explained above), where you can select three to five friends to be your trusted contacts.
Find “Trusted contacts” and click on “Edit” and then on “Chose trusted contacts“(Fig. 11).

Fig.11

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ii. Type the names of 3-5 of your trusted friends. You can select them one by one.
Don’t forget to click “Confirm” (Fig.12).

To select good trusted contacts:

– Choose people you trust, like friends you’d give a spare key to your house.
– Choose people you can reach without using Facebook, ideally over the phone or in person, since you’ll need to contact them when you can’t log in.
– Choose more people to help you. The more friends you choose, the more people who can help you when you need it.

Fig.12

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iii. As a security measures you’ll be prompted to introduce your account password (even if you are already logged on). Click “Submit” after you are done ( Fig. 13).

Fig. 13

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iv. Immediately after, your trusted friends will appear under “Trusted Contacts“. You can now use them all, remove one or all if not pleased with your choice (Fig.14).

Fig.14

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v. In order to make sure you are the one who made the selection of your trusted friends, Facebook sends you a message (check your mailbox linked to your Facebook account) confirming you added trusted friends (Fig.15).

If you did not do it, then someone most likely hacked into your account. Change your password immediately!

Fig.15

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vi. Using Trusted Contacts

Once you’ve set up your trusted contacts, if you ever have trouble logging in, you’ll have your trusted contacts as an option to help. You just need to call your trusted contacts and let them know you need their help to regain access to your account. Each of them can get a security code for you with instructions on how to help you. Once you get three security codes from your trusted contacts, you can enter them into Facebook to recover your account.

With trusted contacts, there’s no need to worry about remembering the answer to your security question or filling out long web forms to prove who you are. You can recover your account with help from your friends.

***Note: If you have set up your secure browsing, login notifications and chose your recognized devices and you receive an email from Facebook notifying you that someone tried to log on your account on X day from Y location using Z device (and none of those are related to you), then Change your password immediately (as explained under section 1 of this Blog post), because definitely someone tried or succeeded to fraudulently log into your account! (See example in Fig.16).

Fig.16

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Any questions can be submitted to: dan@e-crimeexpert.com
Additional information can be found at: http://www.e-crimeexppert.com
To find out more about Dan Manolescu, visit his LinkedIn page here.
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iOS7 Security issues give access to your photos and more

October 3, 2013 1 comment

E-Crime Expert brings once again to your attention a security issue, thanks to Jose Rodriguez, from Canary Islands which has found this iOS7 Security glitch that gives access to your photos, and enables the sharing of them via Twitter, Mail, Flickr, Message.

The following demo, pictures and testing is done entirely by E-Crime Expert (Dan Manolescu) on one of our devices. This security issues apply to any Apple device (iPhone, Ipad) that runs on iOS7.

How it works:

From the locked screen menu (Fig.1), pull the “Control center” tab up (Fig.2) and click the “Clock” pictogram (Fig.3)

Fig.1

photo 1

Fig.2

photo 2

Fig.3

photo 3

Then, press the “sleep button” until “turn off your device” (Fig.4) message appears. Instead, press “cancel” and right after double click the Home button (Fig.5).

Fig.4

photo 1

Fig.5

photo 2

The “Multitasking” screen will appear (Fig.6). You can now chose the “Camera” app from there and click the “Camera roll” (Fig.7) and you will instantly have access to your photos (Fig.8).

Fig.6

photo 5

Fig.7

photo-4

Fig.8

photo 1

From here, you can share them via Twitter, Facebook, Mail, Flickr (Fig.9).

Fig.9

photo 2
In order to avoid this security glitch, update your iOS:

Go to “Settings” (Fig.10), then to “General” (Fig.11) and after to “Software update” (Fig.12).

Fig.10

photo 3

Fig.11

photo 4

Fig.12

photo 5

Done Deal!

Again, credit goes to: Jose Rodriguez, from Canary Islands (Spain).

Any questions can be submitted to: dan@e-crimeexpert.com
Additional information can be found at: http://www.e-crimeexppert.com
To find out more about Dan Manolescu, visit his LinkedIn page here.
Hit the “subscribe” button in order to be notified when new videos and Articles are posted on this blog.

Do you know what is your child’s age requirement to sign up online?

May 27, 2013 1 comment

As the Internet permeates every aspect of the economy and society, it is also becoming an essential element of our children’s lives. While it can bring considerable benefits for their education and development, it also exposes them to online risks such as access to inappropriate content, harmful interactions with other children or with adults, and exposure to aggressive marketing practices.

Children online can also put their computer systems at risk and disseminate their personal data without understanding the potential long-term privacy consequences.

In addition, there are other risks for children using online environments, such as:

Privacy risks

-cyber-bullying

-cyber-stalking

-age-inappropriate content

-online grooming

-identity theft

-emotional implications.

Beside support and guidance from parents when using the online environment, an appropriate mental development and understanding is important for a child when using an online platform. For these reasons, in both the United States and the European Union, a minimum age requirements for accessing the “online world” was set as a legal requirement.

E-Crime Expert thinks that the minimum age requirements a child should meet when signing up for an email account, Facebook, etc., should be a topic of interest for parents. For these reasons, we researched the minimum age requirements on some of the most popular online sites and platforms.

The Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) in United States applies to the online collection of personal information by persons or entities under U.S. jurisdiction from children under 13 years of age. It details what a website operator must include in a privacy policy, when and how to seek verifiable consent from a parent or guardian, and what responsibilities an operator has to protect children’s privacy and safety online including restrictions on the marketing to those under 13. While children under 13 can legally give out personal information with their parents’ permission, many websites altogether disallow underage children from using their services due to the amount of work involved.

In the European Union, the European Commission released in January 2012, a Proposal on the protection of individuals with regard to the processing of personal data and on the free movement of such data (General Data Protection Regulation).

This Proposal has specific requirements with regards to Children. They deserve specific protection of their personal data, as they may be less aware of risks, consequences, safeguards and their rights in relation to the processing of personal data. To determine when an individual is a child, this Regulation should take over the definition laid down by the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child.

“Article 8
Processing of personal data of a child

For the purposes of this Regulation, in relation to the offering of information society services directly to a child, the processing of personal data of a child below the age of 13 years shall only be lawful if and to the extent that consent is given or authorised by the child’s parent or custodian. The controller (i.e. the person in charge with the collection, use and disclosure of personal data) shall make reasonable efforts to obtain verifiable consent, taking into consideration available technology”.

Following, are the minimum age requirements for children using different Internet websites or Social Networking Services and other online platforms:

facebook-age-restriction

 1.      Facebook:

How old do you have to be to sign up for Facebook?

In order to be eligible to sign up for Facebook, you must be at least 13 years old.

The minimum age requirement on Facebook is more or less enforceable. Simply lying about your birthdate easily circumvents the policy.

The Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) mandates that websites that collect information about users aren’t allowed to sign on anyone under the age of 13. As a result, Facebook’s Statement of Rights and Responsibilities require users of the social network to be at least 13 years old (and even older, in some jurisdictions).

According to MinorMonitor, over 38 percent of children with Facebook accounts are 12-years-old and under. Even more worryingly, 4 percent of children on Facebook are reported to be 6-years-old or younger, which translates to some 800,000 kindergarteners on Facebook.

These results come from a survey of 1,000 parents of children under 18-years-old who use Facebook. The company provides a free, web-based parental tool that gives parents a quick view into their child’s Facebook use, including potential dangerous activities such as the friending of online predators, cyberbullying, violence, drug and alcohol use, as well as sexual references.

2.      Google:

Age requirements on Google Accounts:

  •  United States: 13 or older
  •  Spain: 14 or older
  •  South Korea: 14 or older
  •  Netherlands: 16 or older
  •  All other countries: 13 or older

Some Google products have specific age requirements. Here are a few examples:

  • YouTube: When a YouTube video has been age-restricted, a warning screen is displayed and only users who are 18 or older can watch it. Learn more about age-restricted videos.
  • Google Wallet: 18+
  •  AdSense: 18+
  •  AdWords: 18+

3.      Yahoo

When a child under age 13 attempts to register with Yahoo!, they ask the child to have a parent or guardian create a Yahoo! Family Account to obtain parental permission.

Yahoo! does not contact children under age 13 about special offers or for marketing purposes without a parent’s permission.

Yahoo! does not ask a child under age 13 for more personal information, as a condition of participation, than is reasonably necessary to participate in a given activity or promotion.

Yahoo! is concerned about the safety and privacy of all its users, particularly children. For this reason, parents of children under the age of 13 who wish to allow their children access to the Yahoo! Services must create a Yahoo! Family Account. When you create a Yahoo! Family Account and add your child to the account, you certify that you are at least 18 years old and that you are the legal guardian of the child/children listed on the Yahoo! Family Account. By adding a child to your Yahoo! Family Account, you also give your child permission to access many areas of the Yahoo! Services, including, email, message boards and instant messaging (among others). Please remember that the Yahoo! Services is designed to appeal to a broad audience. Accordingly, as the legal guardian, it is your responsibility to determine whether any of the Yahoo! Services areas and/or Content are appropriate for your child.

4.      Hotmail

As on Hotmail’s Terms of Use is no reference to the age requirements to join the service, we did our own registration and it appears that 13 is the age requirement for joining Hotmail, as shown below:

I.                   Attempt indicating the user is 6 years old

Step 1   

1

Step 2                        

2

Step 3

3

 

II.                Second attempt, indicating the user is 13 years old.

Step 1

4Step 2

5

 

5.        MySpace 

  • You must be at least 13 years old to have a Myspace profile
  • If you’re under 16 years old, you’re not allowed to list your age as over 16 and make your profile public (your profile must be set to private)
  • If you’re under 18, you’re not allowed to list your age as over 18
  • Users under 18 are not able to make changes to their listed age

Notes & Tips

  • If you break any of the above rules, MySpace will be forced to delete your profile for safety and security reasons (it’s all in their Terms of Use)

6.      Skype

Skype not directly sets up an age restriction within their Terms of Use.

“Jurisdiction’s Restrictions: If the law of Your country prohibits You from downloading or using Skype Software because You are under the age limit or because the Skype Software is not allowed in Your country, please don’t use it”.

According to this, for US the minimum age requirement is 13 + (COPPA).

7.      LinkedIn

PRIVACY POLICY, 18!

In terms of LinkedIn’s Privacy Policy:

 ”Children are not eligible to use our service and we ask that minors (under the age of 18) do not submit any personal information to us or use the service.”

8.      Twitter

Age screening on Twitter

Age screening is a way for brands and others to determine online whether a follower meets a minimum age requirement, in a way that is consistent with relevant industry or legal guidelines. This makes it easier for advertisers and others with content not suitable for minors (e.g. alcohol advertisers) to advertise on Twitter.

There apparently, is now age restriction for setting up an account on Twitter (as we set it up without being asked about our age). See below:

Step 1

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Step 2: Done!

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For more advice on how children could stay safe online (you could also share this with your child), click here to visit the material E-Crime Expert specially created for this purpose.

Any questions can be submitted to: dan@e-crimeexpert.com

Additional information can be found at: www.e-crimeexppert.com

Hit the “subscribe” button in order to be notified when new videos and Articles are posted on this blog.

“Great! Finally I can see who is viewing on my profile”. Be aware: Facebook Scam!!!

March 19, 2013 10 comments

Today, E-Crime Expert presents a new “popular” Facebook-related scam. Many users (including myself) have received lately the following message, within their friends’ feeds:

Great! Finally I can see who is viewing on my profile” (Fig. 1).

Fig. 1

Fig. 1

When  clicking the (scam) link, this takes you directly to Facebook application installation screen (Fig. 2):

Fig. 2

Fig. 2

 

By clicking “Allow” that will enable permissions to the scammer (as shown above) . This will allow them to spam their scam messages to all of your friends’ list. Beside the annoying spam, that will allow the scammer to have access to your Facebook personal information (i.e. User’s Basic information, Post on the user’s behalf, Access any data anytime).

Continuing on with the installation redirects you to the following survey scam (Fig. 3):

Fig. 3

Fig. 3

 

 It is important to remember that any Facebook application offering to you who has viewed or visited your profile is certain to be a scam.

Facebook doesn’t allow developers access to the data required to create such apps. Avoid them ALL! In fact, here are Facebook’s own help topics on the subject.

This scam aims to convince users that the application was developed by Facebook. It is advisable that anytime you see a URL in the following format you can be certain that you are dealing with a third party Facebook application:

http://apps[dot]facebook[dot]com/app_name_here’.

Please note that any application having this format, IT IS NOT developed by Facebook, but by it’s partners which could happen to be scammers sometimes.

(Disclaimer: I am not claiming that all Facebook’s partners developers are scammers).

How to remove this application from accesing your personal data and stop spamming your friends’ list:

I.  Clean-up your newsfeed and profile to remove the scam post. (Go under your Facebook Profile page and click the “x” in the top right hand corner of the post-Fig. 4).

Fig. 4

 Fig. 4

 

II. Remove the app from your Facebook account in 4 steps:

1)  Click the upper right corner->Account Settings (Fig. 5):

Fig. 5

Fig. 5

2) Click the “Apps” section on the left hand menu (Fig. 6):

Fig. 6

Fig. 6

3) On the right hand of the new page you will see listed all your applications. Chose the one you would like to delete and click the “x” on the top right side of the application, next to the “Edit” button. Please Note that I chose the HTC Sense app to illustrate this example, but you want to find and delete the app which promise you to reveal your profile’s viewers (Fig. 7):

Fig. 7

Fig. 7

4) You will then be promted to confirm the removal of the application. First check the box on the left corner of the window: “Delete all your…application activity on Facebook” and then click “Remove” (Fig. 8):

Fig. 8

Fig. 8

5) Last but not least, inform your Facebook’s Friends that this is a scam and to not click and accept the application.

If you have any question you could contact: dan@e-crimeexpert.com

Additional information can be found at: www.e-crimeexppert.com

Hit the “subscribe” button in order to be notified when new videos and Articles are posted on this blog.

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